Radical Feminists are “Mainstream”?

So what I normally refer to as “radical feminism” is really mainstream?

That’s for letting me know that. I’m sure there are a lot of women that will be glad to know this as well. Um, maybe not. This is what happens when someone lives in a bubble and doesn’t hear any dissenting voices. They believe that their way must be mainstream.

I’m sure we could all name some prominent women in skepticism that would laugh out loud after reading that post. How someone like this ends up becoming some sort of “voice of feminism” baffles me. It appears that none of the publications she writes for ever bother to try to discover whether or not what she’s saying is true in any way, shape, or form. How about attempting to find even one dissenting opinion?

Declaring your radical ideology mainstream doesn’t make it so, it’s just a minority opinion. That minority appears to be one. Oh sure, her SJW friends, you know, The Usual Suspects will be waving this in everyone’s face from now on. I’m sure they’re sitting back now in self satsfaction having this woman affrim them.

Calling anti-trans* feminists reactionary is another laugh when that’s the exact attitude this author projects in every article I have ever read of hers. Maybe she should step out of her bubble for a while.

Of course, utilizing another metaphor, she should walk away from the echo chamber and start listening to other women’s voices without the ideological filter in place. I’m sure she would be surprised how much she’d learn.

5 thoughts on “Radical Feminists are “Mainstream”?

  1. It seems to me that some aspects of what was once considered radical feminism have become less radical and more accepted today. But feminism has changed quite a bit too so that what we might call radical feminism today would barely have been imagined decades ago. For example, I still have difficulty imagining many of the more influential feminists of a decade ago embracing Internet name-calling as a positive thing.

    • I think of my sister when I consider what I always refer to as “true” feminists. She is, I guess, “2nd wave”, from the late sixties. What she sees today she does not call “feminism”.

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