Making a Point Without Using Epithets

I don’t know bout anyone else, but I don’t curse a lot. On this blog, I don’t regularly use curse words. I don’t curse (out loud!) at home. The reason for that is I don’t want my kid to think it’s okay. I’m no puritan, but I believe I can use other language to express my feelings.

If anyone is thinking right now that I disapprove of how they speak, those people would be wrong. Words are words. I just attempt to find words that actually mean something to express myself. I don’t want my daughter growing up believing that she should use epithets to express herself.

I’m certain she knows every word and every iteration of all of those words. But are they appropriate to use in everyday conversations, especially a disagreement? When I dislike someone, my first reaction may be to tell them to F*** off, but what does that actually mean and have I just lost the argument? Yes, I did.

What I normally say is something to the effect of , You’re stupid, and a jerk, and not worth my time. At that point, the epithets flow unencumbered from the other person, further proving my point.

I know people, good people, that will occasionally use some epithet around their house in front of their children. I don’t condemn them, in some cases it’s even a cultural norm. I used to work with a woman, originally from South Boston, that could not complete a sentence without some iteration of the “F” word. Thats the way she grew up, and she was a really nice person and her language was like that only around people she knew.

Is this an important topic? Probably not, but I think it’s important for all of us, depending o the situation, to guard our language. What I want for my child is for her to be able to argue a point without having to use language which does not move her point forward.

As I mentioned earlier, words are just words but making sure the words used have meaning, and further a conversation or a point is more important Emotional responses do neither.

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